Pursuit of Perfection

All About Sports: Especially Stats and Video Games

Best of the Decade in the NFL — A New Formula for Determining Success

with 5 comments

Note: Thanks to Trey Wingo of ESPN, Mike Reiss of ESPNBoston.com, and the fans at SaintsReport.com’s Forum for getting the word out there about the research I’ve done, allowing me to receive feedback and improve the quality of the formulas used here.  I truly believe that the numbers here are solid and help to quantify each franchise’s success in the NFL over the past decade.

With the close to another decade of play in the National Football League, there has been much conversation about just who the greatest teams and players of the 2000’s are.  Much of this discussion, of course, involves personal opinions based on who a particular fan is rooting for.  In the interest of presenting a quantifiable method of measuring the success of the 32 NFL franchises through the 00’s, an entirely new set of data was required.

One of the most oft-argued points when selecting the team of the 2000’s comes down to how much weight one places on regular season success versus postseason play.  Those who support teams with Super Bowl success like the New England Patriots (Super Bowl XXXVI, XXXVIII, and XXXIX Champions) and the Pittsburgh Steelers (Super Bowl XL and XLIII Champions) lean towards an evaluation that heavily favors postseason results, while those who support teams with regular season success like the Indianapolis Colts point to their multiple 10+ win seasons as the measure of greatness.

The difficulty, then, was to concoct a scoring scheme that puts nearly-equal weight on both regular season and postseason results while simultaneously acknowledging that every NFL team’s goal at the beginning of the season is to become Super Bowl Champions. 

In order to account for regular season success while acknowledging that playoff victories are held in greater regard, the formula recognizes a score of 0.10 for every victory a team accumulated during the decade.  This allows regular season success to have a hand in determining which teams had the best decade performance-wise.  Each team played 16 games per season during the decade, resulting in 160 games played per team.  A team with 10 consecutive 16-game-winning seasons would earn a score of 16 points.

This task was made more difficult by the nature of the 2000’s as a decade; for the first two seasons of the decade, there were six divisions in the NFL, but from 2002-2009 the league had expanded to eight divisions.  As such, there were three Wild Card teams per conference in 2000 and 2001 but only two Wild Card teams per conference for the remainder of the decade.

For the 2000 and 2001 seasons, the teams that earned playoff berths were assigned point values based on their result:

  • The Division Champion with the #1 seed earned 1 point for having the best regular season record in the conference and home-field advantage.
  • The Division Champion with the #2 seed earned 0.75 points for having a playoff bye week.
  • The Division Champion with the #3 seed earned 0.50 points for winning their division but being forced to play during Wild Card Weekend.
  • The three Wild Card teams in each conference earned 0.25 points for making the playoffs.

For the 2002-2009 seasons, the teams that earned playoff berths earned the following points values:

  • The Division Champion with the #1 seed earned 1 point for having home-field advantage in the conference.
  • The Division Champion with the #2 seed earned 0.75 points for having a playoff bye week.
  • The Division Champions with the #3 and 4 seeds earned 0.50 points for winning their division but having to play a Wild Card game.
  • The two Wild Card teams in each conference earned 0.25 points for making the playoffs.

After these base values were assigned based on regular season results, each playoff game won during the postseason in that year was worth an increasing number of points for that team.  These numbers were consistent throughout the decade, as the playoff tree remained the same despite the number of divisions.

  • Winning a Wild Card game is worth 0.50 points, to avoid penalizing teams with bye weeks during the playoffs.  This also allows a #3 or #4 seed to earn the same full 1 point as the #1 or #2 seed if they win their Wild Card game.
  • Winning a Divisional Round game is worth 1 point.
  • Winning a Conference Championship game is worth 1.5 points.
  • Winning the Super Bowl is worth 2 points.

This point value system places the highest emphasis on success in the Conference Championship and Super Bowl results while simultaneously avoiding the problem of placing too much added emphasis on postseason results—if it is indeed possible to over-value championship games.

After running the numbers on the season-by-season results of the National Football League from 2000 through 2009, the following final results were reached.  Note that by this system a 71.00 is the highest possible point total, assuming a single team consistently was the #1 seed in their conference, had undefeated regular season campaigns, and won the Super Bowl for ten years in a row.

1st Place: New England Patriots — 34.20

  • 3 Super Bowl Wins (Super Bowl XXXVI, XXXVIII, XXXIX)
  • 4 Super Bowl Appearances (Super Bowl XXXVI, XXXVIII, XXXIX, XLII)
  • 7 AFC East Division Titles (2001, 2003,  2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009)
  • 112 Regular Season Victories (.700 Winning %)

Analysis: The Patriots had the most Super Bowl wins and appearances during the 2000’s, along with the highest number of division titles during that run.  With all those divisional titles, New England was a playoff team for 7 out of the 10 years in the sample.   The Patriots were also second only to the Colts in overall regular season winning percentage for the decade.  Say what you will about “Spygate” or the character (or lack thereof) of some of the names in New England, but the Patriots had far-and-away the highest score based on this formula; nearly 8 points higher than #2.

2nd Place: Pittsburgh Steelers — 26.30

  • 2 Super Bowl Wins (Super Bowl XL, Super Bowl XLIII)
  • 2 Super Bowl Appearances (Super Bowl XL, Super Bowl XLIII)
  • 1 AFC Central Division Title (2001)
  • 4 AFC North Division Title (2002, 2004, 2007, 2008)
  • 1-time AFC Wild Card Team (2005)
  • 103 Regular Season Victories (.644 Winning %)

Analysis: The Steelers ranked second in Super Bowl wins and tied for second in Super Bowl appearances for the 2000’s, so their 2nd Place finish is not all that surprising.  Six years as a playoff team also helps, with only one playoff appearance as a Wild Card (which led to the Super Bowl XL victory).  The Steelers tied with the Eagles for third in regular season winning percentage.

3rd Place: Indianapolis Colts — 26.00

  • 1 Super Bowl Win (Super Bowl XLI)
  • 2 Super Bowl Appearances (Super Bowl XLI, Super Bowl XLIV)
  • 6 AFC South Division Titles (2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009)
  • 3-time AFC Wild Card Team (2000, 2002, 2008)
  • 115 Regular Season Victories (.719 Winning %)

Analysis: The Colts tied for second in Super Bowl appearances and joined the fraternity of teams with one Super Bowl win in the decade as well.  A win in Super Bowl XLIV would’ve propelled them into 2nd Place over the Steelers, but 9 playoff appearances in 10 years is still an admirable statistic and the Colts had the most regular season victories of any NFL team in the 2000’s.  The one-and-done nature of some of those playoff runs hurt the scoring in the end. 

4th Place: Philadelphia Eagles — 23.55

  • 1 Super Bowl Appearance (Super Bowl XXXIX)
  • 5 NFC East Division Titles (2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2006)
  • 3-time NFC Wild Card Team (2000, 2008, 2009)
  • 103 Regular Season Victories (.644 Winning %)

Analysis: Despite not winning a Super Bowl in the 2000’s, the Eagles ended up in 4th Place overall, ahead of a host of teams with rings.  This can be attributed to Philadelphia’s 8 playoff appearances in 10 years, with multiple trips to the NFC Championship Game and a lone Super Bowl appearance.  The Eagles were quite dominant in the NFC East for the first half of the decade, and tied for 3rd with the Steelers in regular season winning percentage.

5th Place: New York Giants — 19.55

  • 1 Super Bowl Win (Super Bowl XLII)
  • 2 Super Bowl Appearances (Super Bowl XXXV, XLII)
  • 3 NFC East Division Titles (2000, 2005, 2008)
  • 3-time NFC Wild Card Team (2002, 2006, 2007)
  • 88 Regular Season Victories (.550 Winning %)

Analysis: The Giants tied for second place in terms of Super Bowl appearances and joined the ranks of the Colts and Ravens by winning Super Bowl XLII and upsetting the 18-0 Patriots.  Six playoff appearances for the decade is a solid number as well, though the appearances were split between division titles and wild card berths.

6th Place: Baltimore Ravens — 18.95

  • 1 Super Bowl Win (Super Bowl XXXV)
  • 1 Super Bowl Appearance (Super Bowl XXXV)
  • 2 AFC North Division Titles (2003, 2006)
  • 4-time AFC Wild Card Team (2000, 2001, 2008, 2009)
  • 92 Regular Season Victories (.575 Winning %)

Analysis:  Baltimore played in the first proper Super Bowl of the 2000’s (though Super Bowl XXXIV was technically held in 2000) and won it as a Wild Card team to take home their biggest points.  The Ravens were a solid 6-time playoff team in the decade as well.

7th Place: New Orleans Saints — 16.55

  • 1 Super Bowl Win (Super Bowl XLIV)
  • 1 Super Bowl Appearance (Super Bowl XLIV)
  • 1 NFC West Division Title (2000)
  • 2 NFC South Division Titles (2006, 2009)
  • 83 Regular Season Victories (.519 Winning %)

Analysis: With only three playoff appearances on the decade, the Saints might be ranked a little high on the list.  However, their high point score is the result of their recent win in Super Bowl XLIV and a playoff push all the way to the NFC Championship Game in 2006.  It doesn’t hurt that all three playoff appearances came by way of division titles as well.

8th Place: Tampa Bay Buccaneers — 14.65

  • 1 Super Bowl Win (Super Bowl XXXVII)
  • 1 Super Bowl Appearance (Super Bowl XXXVII)
  • 3 NFC South Division Titles (2002, 2005, 2007)
  • 2-time NFC Wild Card Team (2000, 2001)
  • 79 Regular Season Victories (.494 Winning %)

Analysis: The Buccaneers finished the decade weaker than they started it, but their Super Bowl XXXVII championship helped them make the top 10 of the decade.  With 5 playoff appearances, they did spend half the decade playing in the postseason; three of those as NFC South Champions.  They are, however, the only Top 10 team with a sub-.500 winning percentage on the decade.

9th Place: Seattle Seahawks — 14.45

  • 1 Super Bowl Appearance (Super Bowl XL)
  • 4 NFC West Titles (2004, 2005, 2006, 2007)
  • 1-time NFC Wild Card Team (2003)
  • 82 Regular Season Victories (.513 Winning %)

Analysis: Times have gotten tough for Seattle, but for the middle of the decade they were the class of the NFC West, posting four consecutive division titles preceded by a 2003 Wild Card berth.  That dominance puts them in the Top 10.

10th Place: Green Bay Packers — 14.25

  • 4 NFC North Division Titles (2002, 2003, 2004, 2007)
  • 2-time NFC Wild Card Team (2001, 2009)
  • 95 Regular Season Victories (.594 Winning %)

Analysis: Despite not making a Super Bowl in the 2000’s, the Packers still broke the Top 10 by virtue of strong regular season performance and six playoff appearances on the decade (four by way of Division Titles).

11th Place: Carolina Panthers — 13.90

  • 1 Super Bowl Appearance (Super Bowl XXXVIII)
  • 2 NFC South Division Titles (2003, 2008)
  • 1-time NFC Wild Card Team (2005)
  • 79 Regular Season Victories (.494 Winning %)

Analysis: A top-tier team at times in the NFC, the Panthers finished just outside of the top 10 due in large part to their sub-.500 winning percentage in the regular season.  It seems as though Carolina was in the postseason more often than their 3 appearances attests to, but a strong performance in a losing effort to the Patriots in Super Bowl XXXVIII helps to shine a positive light on the franchise.

12th Place: Tennessee Titans — 13.85

  • 1 AFC Central Division Title (2000)
  • 2 AFC South Division Titles (2002, 2008)
  • 2-time AFC Wild Card Team (2003, 2007)
  • 91 Regular Season Victories (.569 Winning %)

Analysis: The Titans, despite not making a Super Bowl, come in 12th Place thanks in large part to regular season success and three Division Titles.

13th Place: San Diego Chargers — 13.75

  • 5 AFC West Division Titles (2004, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009)
  • 85 Regular Season Victories (.531 Winning %)

Analysis: A dominant force in the AFC West now, the Chargers had a tough start to the decade that kept them out of the Top 10 despite five consecutive Division Titles.

14th Place: Minnesota Vikings — 13.15

  • 1 NFC Central Division Title (2000)
  • 2 NFC North Division Titles (2008, 2009)
  • 1-time NFC Wild Card Team (2004)
  • 84 Regular Season Victories (.525 Winning %)

Analysis: Four playoff appearances, three by way of division titles, but no Super Bowl appearances to show for it.  The Vikings stock would have risen considerably if they hadn’t fumbled away the NFC Championship Game against New Orleans.

15th Place: Chicago Bears — 13.10

  • 1 Super Bowl Appearance (Super Bowl XLI)
  • 1 NFC Central Division Title (2001)
  • 2 NFC North Division Titles (2005, 2006)
  • 81 Regular Season Victories (.506 Winning %)

Analysis: With only three playoff appearances in the decade, the Bears placing here comes mainly as a result of their Super Bowl XLI appearance.  The fact that their playoff appearances all came through division titles helped as well.

16th Place: Oakland Raiders — 12.45

  • 1 Super Bowl Appearance (Super Bowl XXXVII)
  • 3 AFC West Division Titles (2000, 2001, 2002)
  • 62 Regular Season Victories (.388 Winning %)

Analysis: Agood example of a “What have you done for me lately?” team, the Raiders took the AFC West title for the first three years of the decade before fading off into the disarray they’re currently experiencing.  Their lone Super Bowl appearance on the decade came in a tough loss to the Buccaneers and former coach Jon Gruden, and helped to offset a poor regular season winning percentage to come in 16th out of the 32 team field.

17th Place: St. Louis Rams — 12.35

  • 1 Super Bowl Appearance (Super Bowl XXXVI)
  • 2 NFC West Division Titles (2001, 2003)
  • 2-time NFC Wild Card Team (2000, 2004)
  • 71 Regular Season Victories (.444 Winning %)

Analysis: Despite a Super Bowl appearance on the decade and 4 playoff appearances, the Rams find themselves in the bottom half of the league for the 2000’s due to their poor regular season winning percentage, particularly in their 1-win 2009 campaign.

18th Place: New York Jets — 12.00

  • 1 AFC East Division Title (2002)
  • 4-time AFC Wild Card Team (2001, 2004, 2006, 2009)
  • 80 Regular Season Victories (.500 Winning %)

Analysis: The Jets were wild card darlings in the 2000’s.  A lone AFC East title punctuated their 5 playoff appearances on the decade.  Jets fans can feel optimistic going into the 2010’s with an appearance in the AFC Championship last season.

19th Place: Denver Broncos — 11.80

  • 1 AFC West Division Title (2005)
  • 3-time AFC Wild Card Team (2000, 2003, 2004)
  • 93 Regular Season Victories (.581 Winning %)

Analysis: The Broncos had a strong winning percentage for the regular season, but a lack of postseason success keeps them low in the rankings.

20th Place: Arizona Cardinals — 10.70

  • 1 Super Bowl Appearance (Super Bowl XLIII)
  • 2 NFC West Division Titles (2008, 2009)
  • 62 Regular Season Victories (.388 Winning %)

Analysis: If not for the last two seasons, the Cardinals would’ve come in much lower than 20th place.  As it is, they are the lowest NFL team with a Super Bowl appearance during the 2000’s.  The next few seasons without Kurt Warner will be key in defining which path this franchise follows.  Note that the Cardinals take the tie-breaker over the Cowboys (this is the only tie score under the revised formula) as a result of their Super Bowl appearance.

21st Place: Dallas Cowboys — 10.70

  • 2 NFC East Division Titles (2007, 2009)
  • 2-time NFC Wild Card Team (2003, 2006)
  • 82 Regular Season Victories (.513 Winning %)

Analysis: “America’s Team” made four playoff appearances in the 2000’s, never progressing beyond the Divisional Round.

22nd Place: Atlanta Falcons — 10.25

  • 1 NFC South Division Title (2004)
  • 2-time NFC Wild Card Team (2002, 2008)
  • 75 Regular Season Victories (.469 Winning %)

Analysis: Three playoff appearances, one by way of the NFC South title.  The Falcons made a run in 2004 before losing the NFC Championship game to Philadelphia.

23rd Place: Miami Dolphins — 9.65

  • 2 AFC East Division Titles (2000, 2008)
  • 1-time AFC Wild Card Team (2001)
  • 79 Regular Season Victories (.494 Winning %)

Analysis: Three playoff appearances for the Dolphins, with only one appearance beyond the Wild Card round.  Two division titles in an AFC East dominated by  New England is commendable, and more than the Jets earned at 18th Place.

24th Place: Jacksonville Jaguars — 8.60

  • 2-time AFC Wild Card Team (2005, 2007)
  • 76 Regular Season Victories (.475 Winning %)

Analysis: Competing in the tough AFC South, the Jaguars turned 2 Wild Card berths into a single playoff victory on the decade. 

25th Place: San Francisco 49ers — 8.05

  • 1 NFC West Division Title (2002)
  • 1-time NFC Wild Card Team (2001)
  • 68 Regular Season Victories (.425 Winning %)

Analysis: Only 2 playoff appearances for the 49ers; both in the early years of the decade.  One playoff victory to go with the Division Title and Wild Card.

26th Place: Washington Redskins — 8.00

  • 2-time NFC Wild Card Team (2005, 2007)
  • 70 Regular Season Victories (.438 Winning %)

Analysis: The Redskins were able to make 2 Wild Card appearances in the middle of the decade, but they are hampered in the ranking by their low regular season winning percentage.

27th Place: Cincinnati Bengals — 7.80

  • 2 AFC North Division Titles (2005, 2009)
  • 68 Regular Season Victories (.425 Winning %)

Analysis: The Bengals took a tough AFC North twice in the second half of the decade, but failed to turn regular season results into postseason wins.

28th Place: Kansas City Chiefs — 7.75

  • 1 AFC West Division Title (2003)
  • 1-time AFC Wild Card Team (2006)
  • 70 Regular Season Victories (.438 Winning %)

Analysis: The 2003 Division Title seems long ago for the hapless Chiefs of the decade’s close.  No playoff wins on the decade to go with the 2006 Wild Card.

29th Place: Buffalo Bills — 6.60

  • 0 Playoff Appearances
  • 66 Regular Season Victories (.413 Winning %)

Analysis: A franchise that once posted four straight Super Bowl appearances (though, admittedly, they lost all four) failed to make the playoffs at all in the 2000’s.

30th Place: Cleveland Browns — 5.95

  • 1-time AFC Wild Card Team (2002)
  • 57 Regular Season Victories (.356 Winning %)

Analysis: Cleveland made the playoffs once in a 2002 Wild Card campaign that resulted in a one-and-done.  They are the lowest-ranked team with a playoff appearance on the decade.

31st Place: Houston Texans — 4.90

  • 0 Playoff Appearances (Franchise Began in 2002)
  • 49 Regular Season Victories in 128 Games (.383 Winning %)

Analysis: Since their entry in 2002, the Texans have only posted one winning season and no playoff appearances.  Despite playing for two fewer seasons, their regular season winning percentage is still higher than the Lions.

32. Detroit Lions — 4.20

  • 0 Playoff Appearances
  • 0-16 Regular Season (2008)
  • 42 Regular Season Victories (.263 Winning %)

Analysis: Rough stretch for the Lions in the 2000’s as well; they get the title of last place overall thanks to their winless 2008 campaign.

Results by Current NFL Division

AFC East — (Average Overall Finish: 17.75)

  1. Patriots (1st Overall)
  2. Jets (18th Overall)
  3. Dolphins (23rd Overall)
  4. Bills (29th Overall)

AFC North — (Average Overall Finish: 16.25)

  1. Steelers (2nd Overall)
  2. Ravens (6th Overall)
  3. Bengals (27th Overall)
  4. Browns (30th Overall)

AFC South — (Average Overall Finish: 17.50)

  1. Colts (3rd Overall)
  2. Titans (12th Overall)
  3. Jaguars (24th Overall)
  4. Texans (31st Overall)

AFC West — (Average Overall Finish: 19)

  1. Chargers (13th Overall)
  2. Raiders (16th Overall)
  3. Broncos (19th Overall)
  4. Chiefs (28th Overall)

NFC East — (Average Overall Finish: 14)

  1. Eagles (4th Overall)
  2. Giants (5th Overall)
  3. Cowboys (21st Overall)
  4. Redskins (26th Overall)

NFC North — (Average Overall Finish: 17.75)

  1. Packers (10th Overall)
  2. Vikings (14th Overall)
  3. Bears (15th Overall)
  4. Lions (32nd Overall)

NFC South — (Average Overall Finish: 12)

  1. Saints (7th Overall)
  2. Buccaneers (8th Overall)
  3. Panthers (11th Overall)
  4. Falcons (22nd Overall)

NFC West — (Average Overall Finish: 17.75)

  1. Seahawks (9th Overall)
  2. Rams (17th Overall)
  3. Cardinals (20th Overall)
  4. 49ers (25th Overall)

Based on the average overall finish from each division in the NFL for the 2000’s, here is a “Power Ranking” for which divisions were toughest (note that this is not a very scientific measure, and is only meant for illustrative purposes):

  1. NFC South (Average Overall Finish: 12)
  2. NFC East (Average Overall Finish: 14)
  3. AFC North (Average Overall Finish: 16.25)
  4. AFC South (Average Overall Finish: 17.50)
  5. AFC East (Average Overall Finish: 17.75)
  6. NFC North (Average Overall Finish: 17.75)
  7. NFC West (Average Overall Finish: 17.75)
  8. AFC West (Average Overall Finish 19)

So, based on this admittedly unscientific average result formula, the NFC South would be the toughest division to play in during the 2000’s as a decade while the AFC West was the easiest to play in. 

Results by Current NFL Conference

American Football Conference — (Average Overall Finish: 17.625)

  1. Patriots (1st Overall)
  2. Steelers (2nd Overall)
  3. Colts (3rd Overall)
  4. Ravens (6th Overall)
  5. Titans (12th Overall)
  6. Chargers (13th Overall)
  7. Raiders (16th Overall)
  8. Jets (18th Overall)
  9. Broncos (19th Overall)
  10. Dolphins (23rd Overall)
  11. Jaguars (24th Overall)
  12. Bengals (27th Overall)
  13. Chiefs (28th Overall)
  14. Bills (29th Overall)
  15. Browns (30th Overall)
  16. Texans (31st Overall)

National Football Conference — (Average Overall Finish: 15.375)

  1. Eagles (4th Overall)
  2. Giants (5th Overall)
  3. Saints (7th Overall)
  4. Buccaneers (8th Overall)
  5. Seahawks (9th Overall)
  6. Packers (10th Overall)
  7. Panthers (11th Overall)
  8. Vikings (14th Overall)
  9. Bears (15th Overall)
  10. Rams (17th Overall)
  11. Cardinals (20th Overall)
  12. Cowboys (21st Overall)
  13. Falcons (22nd Overall)
  14. 49ers (25th Overall)
  15. Redkins (26th Overall)
  16. Lions (32nd Overall)

With all of that said, I would invite you as readers to weigh in on this analysis.  Agreements?  Disagreements?  Suggestions?  I welcome them all.  Just be civil, and avoid spiraling out of control by ripping on other teams and starting flame-wars.

The team names and logos included in this post are the property of the National Football League and their respective teams.  I make no claim to ownership of any of these names or logos and will remove them immediately upon request.

The work included in this blog posting and the formulas contained within are the intellectual property of the author, Brian Parker.  Any outside use or reproduction outside of this blog posting is expressly prohibited.  Please contact the author at briparks@hotmail.com to request the right to reproduce this information.

Written by Brian Parker

February 16, 2010 at 6:35 AM

Posted in Uncategorized

5 Responses

Subscribe to comments with RSS.

  1. By my calculation, your points total is correct for the Tennessee Titans, but in your list you didn’t mention their 2000 AFC Central title. Shouldn’t that give them a tiebreaker over Minnesota? You should also double check the math for them as well since they also had the #1 seed that year, but I think 4.75 is correct.

    Buddy Walker

    February 16, 2010 at 9:13 AM

    • @Buddy Walker:

      Nice catch! I absolutely missed that 2000 AFC Central Title for the Titans. I guess I overlooked it when I was writing up each teams “résumés” becauase the Titans were one-and-done that postseason. As a result, they would be in 16th while Minnesota moves to 17th.

      Vikings were the #2 seed in the NFC for the 2000 season, also.

      Of course, under the revised formula, the ratings changed pretty significantly anyway.

      Brian Parker

      February 16, 2010 at 9:26 AM

  2. Interesting formula, but I think there is too much emphasis on postseason performance.

    A way to offset this would be to give each team .05 points for each regular season win, and subtract .05 points for each regular season loss. A perfect regular season would be worth .8, and Detroit’s 0-16 season would be worth -.8, with an 8-8 team having earning zero points.

    This would penalize teams that were very bad, and reward consistent success. The high playoff win weights would still place the emphasis on postseason performance, where it should be, without completely discounting regular season performance. Only 12 of 32 make the postseason, but of those 20 teams some are much worse than others and should be penalized.

    Because let’s face it, any objective formula used in analysis of the teams of the past decade simply cannot have the Cincinatti Bengals finish out of the bottom 5.

    Earl Clay

    February 15, 2010 at 11:34 PM

    • @Earl Clay:

      Update: The formula was improved based upon your comments, with a score of 0.10 being awarded for every regular season win that a team had in the 2000’s. Interestingly enough, the Bengals still finished just outside the bottom 5. The numbers are conspiring against them going any lower, it would appear.

      Brian Parker

      February 16, 2010 at 7:46 AM

  3. […] games as any other franchise from the 7 seasons of the sample size.  Connecting to my research on Best Team of the 2000s in the NFL, it is interesting to note that just 4 more regular season victories would’ve allowed the […]


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: